The D-Day Landings on 6 June 1944 were nothing less than the largest and most complex combined airborne and amphibious military operation of all time. Today this epic history attracts millions of visitors to reflect on what was achieved – and why.

Utah Beach

Utah Beach

Stretching from Sainte-Marie-du-Mont to Quinéville, the Utah sector was to be key to capturing the port of Cherbourg as soon as possible. The Utah Beach D-Day Museum takes you through events in chronological order.

Omaha Beach

Omaha Beach

Two thirds of the seaborne effort by the United States on D-Day were launched against a four-mile long beach overlooked by steep bluffs and blocked off at either end by limestone cliffs, the place they call ‘Bloody Omaha.’

Gold Beach

Gold Beach

The British 50th Northumbrian Division, commanded by Major-General Graham, landed on Gold Beach on D-Day. By the evening, they were on the outskirts of Bayeux, and liberated the town the next day.

Juno Beach

Juno Beach

On D-Day, 14 000 Canadians and 6,400 British troops landed on Juno Beach, taking heavy casualties. At Courseulles-sur-Mer, the Juno Beach Centre is the only museum entirely funded by veterans and their charities, and commemorates Canada’s unique contribution.

Sword Beach

Sword Beach

‘Sword’ was the code name thought up by the Allies for one of the two British sectors. Sword Beach extends west from Ouistreham to Lion-sur-Mer.

Visiting the D-Day Landing Beaches

Find your way

Visiting the D-Day Landing Beaches

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy were predominantly fought in the départements of Calvados, Manche and Orne, and it is here that you will find the many memorials, cemeteries and museums that commemorate what happened.

Don’t miss

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy
D-Day and the Battle of Normandy sites and museums
D-Day 1944 visitor guide