Alençon

Normandie Tourisme
Honoured by UNESCO, as well as by a museum in town, Alençon is particularly proud of its unique lace-making traditions… as it is of its many extraordinary women. The town has architectural highlights too as one-time capital of a little duchy and as historic capital of the southern Norman département of Orne.

Alençon

A town surrounded by regional parks

Alençon owes much of its renown to influential women. Thanks in good part to its own dukes and to their wealthy wives, grand buildings went up in Alençon, from the stern castle to elaborate churches.

Through marriage to dukes of Alençon, two powerful Marguerites born in the second half of the 15th century, Marguerite de Lorraine, followed by her daughter-in-law Marguerite d’Angoulême, became closely associated with the place. Marguerite de Lorraine held her court here. Marguerite d’Angoulême was the learned sister of larger-than-life King François I, France’s rival to King Henry VIII of England.

Alençon has long been celebrated for its lace-making traditions, dating back to the 17th century. A large percentage of women in the area became involved, creating unique, elaborate lace for the French court. Point d’Alençon became known as ‘queen of laces and the lace of queens’. The great skill needed to make Alençon needlepoint lace has led to it receiving the rare honour of being listed by UNESCO as part of the world’s cultural heritage.

Alençon has long been celebrated for its lace-making traditions, dating back to the 17th century. A large percentage of women in the area became involved, creating unique, elaborate lace for the French court. Point d’Alençon became known as ‘queen of laces and the lace of queens’. The great skill needed to make Alençon needlepoint lace has led to it receiving the rare honour of being listed by UNESCO as part of the world’s cultural heritage.

Alençon was the birthplace, in 1873, of Thérèse Martin. She joined a religious order exceptionally early and would become one of the most popular of French saints. Although most closely associated with Lisieux, another Norman town, Alençon lies firmly on her pilgrimage trail.

In the 19th century, a few remarkable buildings were added to the town. Later, during World War II, Alençon was largely spared the destruction that many Norman towns suffered. In summer 1944, it became the first town in France to be liberated by French troops, under General Leclerc.

Alençon is surrounded on three sides by forests. Two beautiful regional parks virtually encircle the Alençon area, the Parc Régional Naturel Normandie-Maine to the west and the Parc Régional Naturel du Perche to the east.

 

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Plan your weekend or your holidays in Alençon

Practical information

The tourist office
> Website

The official site for tourism in Orne
> Website